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November 2012 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine

November 2012 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine

Susan's Heirloom World
Charlton Heston's Northwoods Boyhood
Freshwater Epiphany
MyNorth Holidays
MyNorth Medical Guide 

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November 2012 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine

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November 2012 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine

Susan's Heirloom World
We ask Susan Odom, food historian, owner of Hillside Homestead Inn and fantastic pie chef to share recipes and secrets of holiday pies.

Charlton Heston's Northwoods Boyhood
One of America's most legendary acting careers was launched in Northern Michigan by a lone boy with an active imagination.

Freshwater Epiphany
When photographer Elizabeth Price hit a creative wall, she looked to surfers on the big lake near her home for inspiration.

MyNorth Holidays
Gifts that celebrate the special spirit of Northern Michigan.


Medical Guide
Our annual look at advances in medical services and technology in Northern Michigan.


Departments
Up North-Caberfae’s 75th birthday, lovely maps of your favorite place, a musical CD called Leelanau, cute handmade hats.
November Events-There’s more to the month than turkey day—expand your fun factor.
Travel-Score fab deals and fun times at resorts in November—a sampler.
Up In Michigan-Hanging out with Josh Wunch, third-generation apple farmer.
Dining-Big and warm burgers to sidle up to in November.
Local Foodie-Pattypan Parmesan
Microbrews-Dark beers for a dark month. Naturally.
Into the North-Moody but beautiful in November.

 

And Deborah Wyatt Fellows's column ...

The Joy of Slow Connections

In the year 1910, Henry Ford patented the automatic transmission and Standard Oil was ordered to break up, deemed an unreasonable monopoly. This is the year often cited as the start of domestic tourism in the United States, with the opening of Glacier National Park. There was even a "See America First" campaign, aimed at capturing a middle class that was beginning to take vacations. The industrial revolution was in full swing, but most of the 92,228,496 citizens of the country lived in rural settings. Presumably, for many living in that year, the world would have appeared to be moving very, very fast. But for many in the rural countryside, life was much the same, made slightly easier by the introduction of lightweight pots and alternatives to hearth cooking. ...

... Read the rest of Deborah Wyatt Fellows's column in the November 2012 issue of Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine.