October 2016 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine

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October 2016 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine
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Michigan’s Magnificent Autumn
TOUR! Farm Market Stand Standouts
EXPLORE! U.P. Color
ENJOY! Hared Ciders for Fall

    ▪    Pumpkin Goes Gourmet: 5 Autumn recipes from Chandlers’ chef
    ▪    SMART, EDGY, PROVOCATIVE: Meet Parallel 45 Theatre
    ▪    RITE OF FALL Pheasants at Wycamp Lake Hunt Club

Bonus: 5 Places to catch the color


Plus Northern Home & Cottage Tour

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October 2016 Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine

Autumn Wander
An annual fall roam across the U.P. re-sets the karma for photographer Erik Olsen. Bonus: he returns with gorgeous images and inspiration to share.

The Great Pumpkin
Chandler’s chef Tommy Kaszubowski channels an abiding love for Halloween (thanks to his mom) into irresistibly delicious pumpkin creations. Must-make recipes for your fall table!

Pheasants in the Fall
At a classic hunt club up Petoskey way, the autumn rite of pheasants and dogs and friends and fields happens with the reliability of fall equinox.

Adventurous Minds
Practically nobody possesses the artistic daring to bring edgy, provocative, unexpected and sometimes uncomfortable theater to small town America—meet two women not afraid to go there.


Northern Home & Cottage
The Northern Home & Cottage Kitchen and Home Tour, Emmet, Antrim and Cheboygan

MyNorth Giving Guide, Too!

Departments
October Events
Tour the colors, stop in at an event. Naturally!

Travel
Five color tours we love! Make it a weekend.

Up in Michigan
Thoughts on naming a pup.

Dining
Farm market stand standouts.

Local Foodie
Nada Saco shares her soul-satisfying roasted root veggie recipe.

Drinks
Hard ciders 101: insight on cider styles. Plus tasting suggestions.
Into the North Autumn, oh man.

On the Cover:
Photo: Bare Bluff, Keweenaw Peninsula, by Erik Olsen

 

And Deborah Wyatt Fellows's column ...

TURNING MY FACE TO THE SUN

BY DEBORAH WYATT FELLOWS

We are among the people found on every lake who don’t take their dock out until “the last possible moment.” Our boat waits stoically in its hoist, and the kayaks are still stowed at the shoreline after the leaves are long gone. And I know we share with others those mornings when we wake to discover we’ve waited one moment too long: a fierce north wind rages, and in its clutches is a heavy, wet snow. Oops.

More times than I’d share here I’ve stood shivering at the boat launch a mile from our house and shielded my eyes against the snow coming at me horizontally, trying to catch a glimpse of my husband and our boat. One year he emerged from a blinding snow that swirled along the lake’s surface in a funnel pattern, his face nearly frostbitten, taking the brunt of the storm head on as he tried to navigate to the launch’s dock. In a fit of fancy, we even left the swim raft in the water one year. But after a sudden bluster came up in the night, … 

... Read the rest of Deborah Wyatt Fellows's column in the October 2016 issue of Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine.